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DC Region a Major Hub for Tech Jobs

WASHINGTON, DC -- American Electronics Association, the nation's largest technology trade association, released its 11th annual Cyberstates report detailing national and state trends in high-tech employment, wages, and other key economic factors.

Cyberstates finds that the D.C. Capital region (which combines the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia) is a growing hub for high-tech companies to locate operations. Virginia has earned the distinction of having the highest concentration of tech workers in the country in 2006, the most current state data available. Virginia added 9,800 tech industry jobs, Maryland added 3,200, and the District of Columbia added 600. Though a metropolitan breakdown of the location of these jobs is not available in Cyberstates 2008, anecdotal evidence shows that much of the growth in Virginia and Maryland is clustered in the suburbs of Washington, DC.

This recent job growth has made the entire region a hub for high-tech activity and a generator of high paying jobs. In terms of tech concentration, Virginia has the highest number of tech workers as a percentage of the overall private sector workforce ­ 9.0 percent. The District of Columbia has the 4th highest concentration of tech workers ­ 8.0 percent. And Maryland has the 5th highest concentration ­ 7.9 percent.

The Cyberstates report shows that these jobs are also well paid. Virginia's average annual high-tech wage is $86,400 ­ 98 percent more than the state's average private sector wage the 6th largest in the country. D.C.'s average high-tech wage is $85,700 ­ 31 percent more than the District's average private sector wage. And Maryland's average high-tech wage is $80,800 ­ 82 percent more than the state's average private sector wage.

Venture capital investments in the D.C. capital region totaled $1.2 billion in 2007, up $91.1 million from 2006. This would make the combined region the 5th ranked cyberstate by this metric.

"The DC Capital region may not immediately come to mind when people think of high tech, but it should," said Matthew Kazmierczak, Vice President of Research and Industry Analysis, AeA. "Proximity to the federal government, including its major research centers, combined with a highly educated workforce, has made the area a key location for innovation. If you were to combine DC, Maryland, and Virginia, you would have the 2nd largest cyberstate by tech employment, slightly ahead of Texas."
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·What Does High Tech Mean for the Capital Region (combining the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia)?

- 471,900 high-tech workers in 2006 (would be the 2nd largest cyberstate)
 
- 13,600 jobs gained between 2005 and 2006 (would be 3rd ranked after Texas, which added 13,700 jobs)
 
- As a percentage of the private sector workforce, Virginia has the highest concentration of tech workers in the country (9.1 percent); the District of Columbia has the 4th highest concentration (8.1 percent); and Maryland has the 5th highest concentration (8.0 percent)
 
- Average annual high-tech wages: Virginia's is $86,400 ­ 6th ranked and 98 percent more than the state's average private sector wage; the District of Columbia's is $85,700 ­ 7th ranked and 31 percent more than the district's average private sector wage; Maryland's is $80,800 ­ 11th ranked and 82 percent more than the state's average private sector wage
 
- A high-tech payroll of $39.8 billion in 2006, (would be the 2nd ranked cyberstate)
 
- 26,600 high-tech establishments in 2006, (would be the 2nd ranked cyberstate)
 
- Venture capital investments of $1.2 billion in 2007, up $91.1 million from 2006 (would be 5th ranked cyberstate)

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